Hospitality industry

The hospitality industry is a broad category of fields within service industry that includes lodging, event planning, theme parks, transportation, cruise line, and additional fields within the tourism industry. The hospitality industry is a multibillion-dollar industry that depends on the availability of leisure time and disposable income. A hospitality unit such as a restaurant, hotel, or an amusement park consists of multiple groups such as facility maintenance and direct operations (servers, housekeepers, porters, kitchen workers, bartenders, management, marketing, and human resources etc.). Usage rate, or its inverse “vacancy rate”, is an important variable for the hospitality industry. Just as a factory owner would wish a productive asset to be in use as much as possible (as opposed to having to pay fixed costs while the factory is not producing), so do restaurants, hotels, and theme parks seek to maximize the number of customers they “process” in all sectors. This led to formation of services with the aim to increase usage rate provided by hotel consolidators. Information about required or offered products are brokered on business networks used by vendors as well as purchasers.

In looking at various industries, “barriers to entry” by newcomers and competitive advantages between current players are very important. Among other things, hospitality industry players find advantage in old classics (location), initial and ongoing investment support (reflected in the material upkeep of facilities and the luxuries located therein), and particular themes adopted by the marketing arm of the organization in question (for example at theme restaurants). Also very important are the characteristics of the personnel working in direct contact with the customers. The authenticity, professionalism, and actual concern for the happiness and well-being of the customers that is communicated by successful organizations is a clear competitive advantage. Companies in this industry operate short-term lodging facilities, including hotels, motels, and resort hotels. Major companies include Choice Hotels, Hilton, Hyatt, Marriott, and Wyndham (all based in the US), as well as Accor (France), InterContinental Hotels Group (UK), Jin Jiang Hotels (China), NH Hotel Group (Spain), and Whitbread (UK).

The global hotel industry generates more than $500 billion in revenue per year, according to Statista. The most popular travel destinations include France, the US, Spain, China, and Italy. Fast-growing international tourism markets include Japan, Thailand, Hungary, and Myanmar. Emerging regions are expected to drive worldwide tourism industry growth over the next 15 years, led by the Asia/Pacific region. The US hotel, motel, and resort industry consists of about 40,000 companies that operate about 53,000 properties with combined annual revenue of about $175 billion. The industry does not include casino hotels and resorts, which are covered in a separate profile.

COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

Business and tourist travel drive demand. Both are affected by the strength of the economy. The profitability of individual companies depends on efficient operations, because many costs are fixed, and on effective marketing. Large companies have advantages in economies of scale in operations, can more easily raise capital, and have strong name recognition. Small companies, such as boutique hotels, can compete effectively in favorable locations and by providing specialty services. The US industry is fragmented: the 50 largest companies generate about 45%